Thermablok NASA Spinoff Listed
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Thermalblok insulation strips easily applied to metal stud
One Thermablok® Strip Increases
R-Value up to by 40%

Infrared detects heat loss (thermal bridging) in building
Infrared camera displays heat coming through the studs in a
wall. Known as "thermal bridging" this is the prime energy loss in a building. Thermablok interrupts this wasteful process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thermablok® Technical Support

Thermablok Physical Properties

Thickness
Max. Use Temperature
Color
Density
Hydrophobic
Material Form
R-Value

0.40 in (10 mm)
390°F (200°C)
White
9.4 lb/ft3 (0.15 g/cc)
Yes
57 in (1,450 mm) wide     3/8" X 1.5" X 4.5' long
R-Value = 10.3 / inch


Thermablok Standards Organization Test Results

Test Procedure

ASTM C 177
EN 12667
ASTM C 518
ASTM E 84
EN13501-1: 2007
ASTM C 165
Specific Heat
ASTM E 96
ASTM E 228
ASTM C 1104
Results

0.0131 W/m*K @ 10°C
0.0131 W/m*K @ 10°C
0.0148 W/m*K @ 2°C (avg of 3 samples)
Class A: FSI >5, SDI 20
Passed Euroclass C-s1,d0
8.0psi @ 10% strain, 30.5 psi @ 25% strain
1.00 J/g*K @ 40°C
1877 ng/Pa*s*m2 (dry cup method)
X: 1.06 x 10-5 K-1, y: 1.90 x 10-5K-1
Mass Gain = 1.08%

Property

Thermal Conductivity via Guarded Hot Plate
Thermal Conductivity via Guarded Hot Plate
Thermal Conductivity via Heat Flow Meter
Flame and Smoke Spread
Reaction to Fire Performance
Compressive Stress / Strain
Specific Heat
Water Vapor Transmission Rate
Linear Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (@ 10°C)
Water Vapor Sorption


Common Insulators: R-Value / U-Value - Energy of Mfg / CO2 (Environmental Impact)

Material


Thermablok


Fiberglass


Polyisocyanurate



Polystyrene
(Expanded)
(Extruded)
R-Value


10.3 USA
1.813 Metric

3.8 USA
0.669 Metric

6.0 USA
1.056 Metric


4.5 USA
0.792 Metric
U-Value*
(W/m-K)


0.014


0.040


0.024



0.032
Energy /
Mfg


50.0


39.2


69.8



116.3
CO2 /
Mfg


4.2


1.9


5.5



3.0
Health & Safety


No Known Hazards
(Occupants/Environment)

Some Fiberglass Contains
Formaldehyde - Toxic SbO3

Creates Hydrogen Cyanide
During a Building Fire


Contains Mutagens -
Suspected Carcinogens -
Some add Toxic HBCD
Environment


100% Recylable
(Air/Sand/Poly)

Recyclable


Thermoset - Plastic
Not Recycled
Petroleum Product

Polluting the Oceans
Little is Recycled
(Breaks down in the
Environment creating
Vinyl-Benzene)
Petroleum Product

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes: R-value is expressed in ft2•h•°F/Btu. U-value is expressed in W/m-K per standard convention.


Wall R-Value losses from Thermal Bridging

Nominal Framing
Depth and Spacing


2" X4" @ 16" Center



2" X 4" @ 24" Center



2" X 6" @ 16" Center


2" X 6" @ 24" Center
"Labeled" Batt Insulation
R-Values Between Studs


R-11
R-13
R-15

R-11
R-13
R-15

R-19
R-21

R-19
R-21
Effective R-Values
Batt Insulation / Steel Studs


5.5
6.0
6.4

6.6
7.2
7.8

7.1
7.4

8.6
9.0
Wall Thermal Loss
R-Value


50%
64%
67%

40%
45%
48%

63%
65%

55%
57%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Simple  ORNL Whole Wall R Value Calculator


Property Dimension
(in)
Resistivity
ft2 hr °F/BTU
Notes

Interior
Finish
Layer 1 di1=
 

Can be used for Thermablok Aerogel Insulation Strips

Layer 2 di2=
 
Stud Flange L = Common Value: 0.0025
Depth dc=
Thickness t =
Spacing s =
 
Cavity Insulation dc When using Thermablok Strips

Input Value = (C-B)/D
  • Total Cavity Insulation R Value (C) =  (Insulation R/inch) X (D + A)
  • Thermablok Layer Thickness Inches (A)
  • Thermablok R Value (B) = A X 10.3
  • Stud Depth (D)
 
Exterior
Finish
Layer 3 de3=
Can be used for Thermablok Aerogel Insulation Strips

Layer 2 de2=
Layer 1 de1=


Notes:

Zone Method - The Zone Method is a variation on the Parallel Path Method designed to account for steel’s impact on adjacent insulation. The Parallel Path Method sums the R-Values for the various components in a wall assembly through two paths – one through the CFS stud and one through the center of the cavity. The sum of the R-Values through each path are inverted to  obtain a UFactor for the path and then weighted based on the area of the wall the paths represent. In the Zone Method, the CFS flange width is increased by two times the total thickness of all finish material layers on the thicker side of the CFS member. This has the effect of increasing the amount of area that is assumed to be influenced by the steel member. The result is a whole-wall U-Factor that can be inverted to yield an effective R-Value for the assembly, although from a code compliance perspective, the main interest is in the U-Factor. The Zone Method tends to underestimate the effective R-Value of a steel assembly, or overestimate the U-Factor. Thus it should be acceptable for code compliance but may unnecessarily penalize a steel assembly. It is currently the only method permitted for calculation of U-Factors for CFS walls in California. The Zone Method is described in more detail in the 2004 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals. Modified Zone Method - The Modified Zone Method was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a follow up to a test program funded by AISI in the early 1990s. The Modified Zone Method is sometimes called the ORNL Method because of this fact. With this calculation method, the flange width is widened by increasing its dimension by a term called “zf” that is defined as a ratio of thermal resistivity of finish material to cavity insulation. Thus, the Modified Zone Method is similar to the Zone Method in that it widens the  assumed width of the flange, but the width size is smaller than in the Zone Method. The Modified Zone Method calculation again breaks the assembly into two paths (framed and non-framed) and performs the path calculations on each. The Modified Zone Method is believed to be the most accurate calculation method based on comparison to test results and finite element analysis conducted by ORNL. It is the method recommended in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals for metal framing. This calculation method is limited to C-shaped steel members and should not be applied to other shapes. It is also limited to clear wall assemblies, which can be a significant issue given that many walls are not clear wall assemblies.

 


Meeting ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Building Envelope Requirements for U.S. Climate Zones

ASHRAE Climate Zoning Map

Climate Zone







1



2



3



4



5



6



7



8
Nonresidential Requirements
All occupancies other than residential






R-13 + 0 ci
U= 0.124
R= 10.6

R-13 + 0 ci
U= 0.124
R= 8.06

R-13 + 3.8 ci
U= 0.084
R= 11.90

R-13 + 7.5 ci
U= 0.064
R= 15.63

R-13 + 7.5 ci
U= 0.064
R= 15.63

R-13 + 7.5 ci
U= 0.064
R= 15.63

R-13 + 7.5 ci
U= 0.064
R= 15.63

R-13 + 7.5 ci
U= 0.064
R= 15.63
Residential Requirements
Spaces in buildings used primarily for living and sleeping. Residential spaces include, but are not limited to, dwelling units, hotel/motel guest rooms, dormitories, nursing homes, patient rooms in hospitals, lodging houses, fraternity/sorority houses, hostels, prisons and fire stations.


R-13 + 0 ci
U= 0.124
R= 10.6

R-13 + 7.5 ci
U= 0.064
R= 15.63

R-13 + 7.5 ci
U= 0.064
R= 15.63

R-13 + 7.5 ci
U= 0.064
R= 15.63

R-13 + 7.5 ci
U= 0.064
R= 15.63

R-13 + 7.5 ci
U= 0.064
R= 15.63

R-13 + 15.6 ci
U= 0.042
R= 23.8

R-13 + 18.8 ci
U= 0.037
R= 27.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Basic Thermal Definitions

Thermal conductivity is an intensive property of a material that measures its capacity to sustain heat flow. The units of thermal conductivity are often provided in metric values of Watts/meter-degree Kelvin or W/m-K. The symbol used to denote thermal conductivity is k (or lambda, λ).

Thermal Resistance (R value)

Heat Transfer Coefficient (U Value)

  • U-value is heat transfer coefficient.
  • Low U values mean good insulation values (very similar to thermal conductivity k).
  • OHTC -> Overall heat transfer coefficient; frequently used to measure the thermal conductance of systems.
  • In the world of systems thermal engineering – U value and OHTC are often used synonymously.